Former fellow Jenny Kye published in April 2018, together with Justice in Aging (JIA) senior staff attorney Kate Lang, In-Kind Support and Maintenance in the SSI Program, an advocacy guide. 

The guide and a related webinar are available through Justice in Aging here.

Jenny's work on the guide was supported by a Borchard Former Fellow Grant in partnership with JIA. She is now a staff attorney with the Community Legal Aid Society, Inc., in Wilmington, Delaware where she advocates for older adults and people with disabilities in public benefits and disability rights matters.

 

Published in Center News
Tuesday, 05 June 2018 12:39

Teresa Yao

Teresa Yao is a May 2018 graduate from Washington University School of Law and the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, where she received her joint JD/MSW degree with a concentration on Older Adults and Aging Society. She has served as an Executive Editor of the Washington University Law Review and Co-Chair of the Public Service Committee of the Public Service Advisory Board.

During both her legal and social work training, Teresa gained an appreciation for the diverse range of legal and social challenges faced by older adults, and the holistic approach necessary to address them. Through her work experience with the ABA Commission on Law and Aging, she was exposed to the breadth of issues in the field of law and aging via involvement in projects on healthcare decision-making, guardianship, and elder abuse. She has engaged in policy and advocacy work with the Alzheimer’s Association, where she spoke with state lawmakers, advocated for caregiver interests, and reviewed statutory language for state legislation pertaining to healthcare decision-making. At Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, she worked directly with victims of domestic abuse and served clients’ legal and social needs as a dual law and social work intern. Most recently, she worked at Crown Center for Senior Living, an independent living community for older adults. There, she interacted directly with senior residents, forming meaningful relationships with older adults from a wide range of cultural and personal backgrounds. In particular, she found her time addressing social needs for Limited-English Proficiency (LEP) older adults to be a rewarding experience, and is keenly interested in continuing to develop programs and resources for this population.

For her Borchard fellowship, Teresa will work on establishing a Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) between her sponsoring organization, the Legal Assistance Foundation, and Rush University Medical Center. The MLP will center on creating a free legal clinic servicing low-income older adults from communities in the West Side of Chicago, with a focus on providing holistic client-centered care that addresses older adults’ legal and social needs. In addition to establishing the community clinic, Teresa will be involved in direct representation for clients that come through the clinic and draft research papers exploring hurdles faced by vulnerable older adult populations, including LEP and isolated seniors.

Published in Fellows
Tuesday, 05 June 2018 10:31

Annie Manhardt

Originally hailing from Everett, WA, Annie Manhardt graduated from Harvard Law School in 2018 after receiving her undergraduate degree in Sociology from Willamette University in 2015. For all three years of law school, Annie participated in the Harvard Prison Legal Assistance Project (PLAP), and served as co-Executive Director of the program during her final year. Annie was first introduced to the issues facing incarcerated elders when she began representing aging prisoners in their disciplinary hearings and parole hearings, and her understanding of the unique challenges facing this population was further informed by her summer internships at Prisoners' Legal Services of Massachusetts and the Prisoners' Rights Office in Vermont.

Annie's experience of living with her grandparents during law school allowed her to see the stark contrast between aging in the free world and aging in prison. As a 2018-19 Borchard Fellow, she hopes to reduce this disparity by returning to the Prisoners' Rights Office in Vermont, where she will implement a project addressing the needs of the state's growing population of elders under penal supervision. She will pursue decarceration strategies for incarcerated elders, petition for the release of elders from terms of probation and parole, litigate cases to improve prison healthcare and age-related accommodations, and work closely with local providers to bridge the gap between elder services and re-entry services by creating a resource guide designed specifically to meet the needs of formerly incarcerated elders.

Published in Fellows
Tuesday, 05 June 2018 10:08

Andrew Bardetti

Andrew Bardetti is a May 2018 graduate from Northeastern University School of Law and will be serving as a Borchard Fellow at South Coastal Counties Legal Services (SCCLS) in Southeastern Massachusetts. After receiving his Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and Philosophy from Boston College in 2012, Andrew served as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) with the Legal Services of Alabama in Mobile. After JVC, he worked as a Campus Minister for Social Justice and Spirituality with the Cornell University and Ithaca College Catholic Communities. In those capacities, he advocated for the needs of vulnerable persons which motivated him to pursue a legal services career in his native state of Massachusetts.

During law school, Andrew chose to pursue a career in law and aging because of his grandmother’s experience in a nursing home and the needs of his elderly neighbors. Internships with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office and Justice Geraldine Hines (ret.) of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court provided a foundation in housing discrimination and systemic issues facing older persons. However, it was his internships with Greater Boston Legal Services’ Elder Abuse Prevention Project and South Coastal Counties Legal Services which cemented his desire to advocate for the needs of older persons experiencing elder abuse in his local community.

As a Borchard Fellow, Andrew will be launching an elder abuse prevention project to address the unmet needs of older persons suffering from abuse in SCCLS’ service area. Based in New Bedford, Andrew will directly represent older persons experiencing elder abuse in housing, consumer, and benefits cases. In addition, Andrew will create and enhance local elder abuse prevention coalitions by incorporating the best practices of existing multi-disciplinary teams. Finally, Andrew will increase the awareness of elder abuse resources in the community by conducting educational seminars and creating legal informational materials.

Published in Fellows

Current Borchard Fellows Kandice Jung and Julie Gilgoff, along with former fellow Catheryn Koss co-presented the workshop, "Planning for Incapacity and the End of Life" at the 2018 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging on March 26 in San Francisco. They shared information about legal documents, potential problems when poor or no planning has occurred, and how to work with surrogates. The audience was made up of social workers, health care practitioners, case managers, and other professionals working with older adults. Their Power Point Presentation is available as an attachment below.

Catheryn Koss, who now serves as the Center's Academic Research Program Coordinator, also co-presented with David Godfrey of the ABA Commission on Law and Aging. The topic of their workshop was, "Integrating Supported Decision-Making Into Advance Care Planning."

Published in Center News
Friday, 02 March 2018 10:29

Call for 2018-19 Fellowship Applications

Three fellowships in law and aging are available for 2018-2019. Interested applicants should submit the required online application by April 16, 2018. See our web page on the fellowships and our online application

Published in Center News
Tuesday, 27 February 2018 11:29

Call for Proposals for the 2018 NALC

The National Aging and Law Conference (NALC) is now accepting proposals for the 2018 conference, to be held October 25-26 in Alexandria, Virginia.

NALC is the only national conference on law and aging focusing primarily on older adults with the greatest social and economic need. The presenter-driven conference is led by attorneys and advocates that develop and deliver services to older adults. The planning committee seeks a mixture of experienced speakers and new voices.

NALC workshops require two or more speakers. Speakers are eligible for a discounted registration rate and all speakers must pay for registration. More information and the required proposal template are available at www.ambar.org/nalc. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions.

Published in Center News
Tuesday, 30 January 2018 08:50

Borchard Fellow Co-Authors JIA Issue Brief

Catherine Bourque, a 2016-17 Borchard Fellow, co-authored an issue brief published by Justice in Aging (JIA) in January 2018. Catherine worked on the brief during her fellowship year with JIA Senior Staff Attorney Kate Lang. Skilled Nursing Facilities and Other Creditors Acting as Representative Payees examines  some of the conflicts that can arise and proposes ways to strengthen the oversight and protections within the Social Security Administration's representative payee system.  

Published in Center News
Thursday, 30 November 2017 16:05

Co-Director Honored

Mary Jane Ciccarello, Center on Law & Aging Co-Director and former fellow, received the Distringuished Pro Bono Service Award on October 23, 2017. The award came during Utah's celebration of Pro Bono Week from the Utah State Bar, Utah Legal Services, and the University of Utah S.J.Quinney College of Law Pro Bono Initiative. Mary Jane was recognized for her work in developing and supporting several pro bono programs while she was the director of the Self-Help Center of the Utah State Courts. 

In November, Mary Jane was one of the coordinators and participants of a special statewide roundtable discussion of interested professionals on the intersection of adult guardianship, involuntary commitment and Utah's new Essential Treatment and Intervention Act. The roundtable was sponsored by Utah's WINGS (Working Interdisciplinary Network of Guardianship Stakeholders) and Utah's Judicial Council. Mary Jane is an active member of WINGS and serves on its executive committee. Utah WINGS posts its information and materials at this link

In September, Mary Jane presented at the 2017 CTC (Court Technology Conference) on "Access from Anywhere: Remote Delivery of Self-Help Services." She spoke about the remote services delivery systems and court clerk training program she developed while director of the Self-Help Center of the Utah State Courts. Her fellow presenters were self-help services directors, Maria Livingston of the Orange County, California Superior Court and Stacey Marz of the Alaska State Courts.

Published in Center News

Fellows Coordinator and former Borchard Fellow Catheryn Koss published recently another article stemming from her research on advance directives. A Question of Trust: Does Mistrust or Perceived Discrimination Account for Race Disparities in Advance Directive Completion? appears in Innovation in Aging, a new academic journal published by the Gerontological Society of America.

Catheryn, now an assistant professor in the Gerontology Program at the California State University in Sacramento, co-authored the article with Professor Tamara Baker. Their results call into question the common assertion that mistrust in medical providers or the health care system contributes to lower rates of advance care planning by black older adults. The authors conclude that future research should examine the potential relationships between advance directive completion and other dimensions of discrimination.

Published in Center News
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